About Martin R. Jackson

 

Martin R Jackson lived in Nottingham before moving to North Norfolk to write fictional novels. For many years he was the Honorary Secretary of the Institute of the Motor Industry for the Nottinghamshire region, and an Incorporated Engineer registered with the Engineering Council UK as a Master Automotive Engineer. He taught Engineering Sciences to Foundation Degree students at West Nottinghamshire College, and was a Consulting Automotive Engineer called upon on numerous occasions to give expert witness testimony in Crown, Magistrates and County Courts. He graduated from Nottingham Trent University with PGCertEd. 

Sir Wilfred Scarlett

The nightmare Knight...

Sir Wilfred Scarlett, Martin's Maine Coon cat features in both "Believe Me!" & "The Blade".

 

      Extract: "Believe Me!"

"JOLT! – He immediately lost flight – falling chaotically… heart fluttering like a dead leaf in the wind – BUMP! – followed by a feather-like brush against his face. Ben McVeigh returned to reality!

‘Phew – bloody hell what a strange ruddy nightmare!’ Ben exclaimed as Sir Wilfred Scarlett hightailed through the door and away. A moth fluttered from his cheek; Sir Wilfred the cat had thought it fair game and had jumped after it landing on Ben’s chest. His heart still pounded away like the pedal of a bass-drum as he looked around and saw that the window was slightly ajar behind the curtain. The moth had succeeded in its frantic enterprise and was fluttering to-and-fro between his face and the wall-lights.

 Genélan, he thought, Genélan."

IN MY OWN WORDS

 

I left school shortly after my fifteenth birthday after being offered a one year trial period as an apprentice motor mechanic. I had no qualifications, but I had a job! During an indentured apprenticeship, I had the good fortune to be educated at Oxford as well as Cambridge! In reality, it was training at the Morris Oxford and Austin Cambridge car manufacturers in the service and repair of Automatic and Transverse gearbox systems! For many years I was the Honorary Secretary of the Institute of the Motor Industry for the Nottinghamshire region, and an Incorporated Engineer registered with the Engineering Council UK as a Master Automotive Engineer. I taught Engineering Sciences to Foundation Degree students at West Nottinghamshire College and was a Consulting Automotive Engineer called upon numerous occasions to give expert witness testimony in Crown, Magistrates and County Courts. I graduated with PGCertEd from Nottingham Trent University. I lived and worked in Nottingham before moving to North Norfolk with my wife to write fictional novels. We have a son and three lovely grandchildren. 

 

WHY DO I WRITE NOVELS?

 

I realised that whilst working as a lecturer and consulting engineer I must have written dozens of books worth of boring educational documents, vehicle reports and the like. When I moved to Norfolk I needed to be suitably occupied so decided to write something more entertaining. I took to writing novels. It wasn’t until then that I found I was confronted by the greatest challenge of all; finding a genuine agent - an agent capable of pushing a novel in the right direction for it to be noticed and considered for publication. When I say "publication", I mean publication for a reasonable profit without being "trotted on" by the vanity brigade. However, the advent of the computer has produced thousands if not millions of prospective bestselling authors. Agents must be knee-deep in manuscripts, some brilliant, some good, and others - well ... I'm probably one of them! Yeah, thinking about it I must be one of those who are attempting to bury the poor literary agents in gobbledygook, but to their great misfortune, there's much more to come! Definitely!


HOW DO I SET ABOUT WRITING MY NOVELS?

 

With regard to progress objectives, I would sooner count chapters per month from a scheme of work than a daily word count. It's probably a hangover from my lecturing days. I know how I want the story to go, so I sketch the plot out roughly and then, working from the SOW, I expand and paint the word pictures in. Composition could be better described as "building" rather than writing a book! I'm not too frightened to scrub large amounts of work if I'm not achieving the objective. This does not set me back in my opinion but sets me on the right path for a wicked twist at the end. I also try to keep my characters memorable and distinct and try not to name too many tertiary individuals. That can tend to confuse the storyline. If talking of a football team it’s not necessary to mention each individual player’s name, only those of the major players! Also, I try not to include too many twists, this can confuse matters and continuity can be lost.

 

I write from a mixture of imagination, personal experience and research. I like the storylines in my novels to have a feeling of truth, so the events and incidents are all possible if a little fanciful. To that end, I draw from a lifetime of experiences and interweave them with daydreams... sometimes nightmares!

Ben McVeigh's fireplace

As described in "The Blade".

     Extract: "The Blade"

 

‘I was just admiring your old flintlock blunderbuss…’ He fibbed. A saucy mag that one – I wonder what happened to that other thing… He picked up the poker and proceeded to casually poke the fire.

‘Got the gun from Newark Antique Market last year,’ Ben replied. ‘Reckon it’s an East-India Company gun… 

Ben McVeigh's Garden

As described in "The Blade".

Extract:  "The Blade"

 

‘Oh well I’m not surprised, Jonno, the rose, it’s called Rambling Rector, must’ve been after your ass I reckon!’

‘Behave – I’ll tell Reverend Hallett, he still wonders about you, mate!’

‘Oh alright… Huh!’  Don’t remind me of that debacle…